{{ (moduleVm.actions && moduleVm.changeStatus) ? moduleVm.status : '' }} 306: Acute Emergent Care RRTs Improving Outcomes through Best Practice

Description

Audio Session and Presentation Slides from National Conference Nurse Practitioners 2018

For many years, rapid response teams, also called medical response teams, have been in place to intervene when a patient is at risk for imminent deterioration. The overall goal of RRTs is to prevent poor patient outcomes, cardiac arrest, and death. These situations can be very challenging and often it is the acute care NP who is responsible for leading these teams. This session will review best practices for RRT activation, RRT response, and how to effectively and efficiently manage the most common clinical conditions that precipitate these calls. 

Learning Objectives/Outcomes

After completing this continuing education activity you will be able to:

  1. Identify best practices for the identification and activation of rapid response teams.
  2. Identify barriers to quality outcomes in the afferent and efferent arms of rapid response activation, response and management.
  3. Identify ways to effectively manage the most common clinical conditions that precipitate rapid response team activation.
Price: $17.95

Credits:

  • ANCC 1.5 CH
  • DC - BON 1.5 CH
  • FL - BON 1.5 CH
  • GA - BON 1.5 CH

Lippincott Professional Development is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. This activity is also provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 11749. Lippincott Professional Development is also an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the District of Columbia Board of Nursing, Florida Board of Nursing, and Georgia Board of Nursing, #50-1223. (CE Broker Course #20-660282)







Test Code: spring2018S306A
Published: May 2018
Expires: 6/30/2020
Sources: Spring 2018 National Conference for Nurse Practitioners
Passing Score: 1/1 (100%)
Authors: Anne Dabrow Woods DNP, MSN, RN, CRNP, ANP-BC, AGACNP-BC, FAAN, Chief Nurse & Publisher, American Journal of Nursing (AJN), Wolters Kluwer, Nurse Practitioner Critical Care Services, Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital